Session Objectives

 

L. Jeffrey Medeiros, MD; Houston, Texas

Objective: In this lecture the recent classification of histiocytic lesions/neoplasms will be reviewed (Blood 127: 2672, 2016) and pathologic findings will be discussed in light of new molecular data.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    • Recognize the clinicopathologic and immunophenotype findings of histiocytic neoplasms;
    • Recognize the important role molecular findings have played in classification;
    • Discuss potential strategies to integrate molecular testing in diagnosis.

Karen Eldin, MD; Houston, Texas (Moderator)

Objective: This session serves as a general overview of getting that first job as a pathologist.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    • Discuss the current job market.
    • Describe how to find unadvertised job opportunities.
    • Explain currently accepted procedures for asking about and pursuing employment opportunities.

Donna Hansel, MD, PhD; La Jolla, California
Sponsored by Baylor College of Medicine

Objective: This lecture will detail problematic areas in the diagnosis of invasive urothelial cancer and how the differential diagnosis in these settings will impact therapy.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    • Recognize challenges and apply tools to correctly diagnosing invasive cancer and realize its impact on treatment;
    • Recognize and correctly diagnose micropapillary and plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma;
    • Understand the diagnostic settings in which BCG, TUR, cystectomy, and other therapies are indicated following a pathological diagnosis.

Sara E. Monaco, MD; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Sponsored by MD Anderson Cancer Center

Objective: This lecture will review the cytomorphological features of common and uncommon entities in FNA and touch preparation specimens, in order to maximize the ability to make specific and accurate cytological diagnoses. In addition, there will be an emphasis on key ancillary studies to order and correlation with histological and molecular findings.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    • Recognize key cytomorphological features of common and uncommon entities in FNA and touch prep specimens;
    • Understand the utility of ancillary studies in the evaluation of cytological specimens to make more specific diagnosis or to help guide treatment;
    • Evaluate the differential diagnosis for different lesions based on key cytomorphological findings in non-gynecological cytopathology.

Rhonda Yantiss, MD; New York, New York
Sponsored by Baylor Scott and White

Objective: Esophageal injury can result from diverse etiologies, including GERD, hypersensitivity, medications, and infection. Distinction between these entities is clinically important, as treatment strategies vary. This lecture summarizes the diagnostic features of different types of esophagitis with
emphasis on key distinguishing features.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants should beable to:
    • Distinguish between gastroesophageal reflux disease and other forms of esophagitis;
    • Recognize features that suggest infectious esophagitis;
    • Know histologic features of medication-induced and immunemediated esophagitis.

Sanja Dacic, MD, PhD; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Sponsored by UTHSCSA

Objective: This lecture will discuss the challenging areas of the 2015 WHO classification of mesotheliomas, as well as diagnostic approach to mesothelial proliferations particularly on
small/cytology specimens. The current role of biomarkers in diagnosis and prognosis of mesotheliomas will be discussed.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    • Recognize prognostically significant morphologic features and subtypes of malignant mesotheliomas.
    • Use ancillary testing in diagnosis and classification of mesothelial proliferation.
    • Become familiar with diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of malignant mesothelioma.

Gregory Fuller, MD; Houston, Texas

Objective: This lecture will focus on practical aspects of contemporary oncologic neuropathology as practiced in 2019, including intraoperative consultation and the rapidly evolving molecular diagnosis and classification of brain tumors.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    • Implement strategies to avoid the most common pitfalls in the intraoperative consultation for brain tumor biopsies;
    • Understand the direction that the molecular classification of brain tumors is taking;
    • Avoid the most common errors in the ordering and interpretation of molecular tests for brain tumor diagnosis and classification.

Alain Borczuk, MD; New York, New York
Sponsored by Houston Methodist

Objective: This lecture will follow the path of a sample for common molecular tests, from tissue triage to how the test is run to report and its impact.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    • Develop tissue triage protocols to optimize testing;
    • Understand the differences in test type, even for the same analyte;
    • Integrate the molecular pathology report into the surgical pathology or cytology report.

Sinchita Roy-Chowdhuri, MD, PhD; Houston, Texas

Objective: With the increasing need to perform necessary biomarker studies in lung carcinoma patients, there is a critical need to optimize collection and handling procedures of small biopsy and cytology samples to conserve tissue for ancillary testing. The College of American Pathologists in collaboration with other medical organizations has come up with evidence based guideline recommendations for
optimizing these processes to maximize the chances of successful testing.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    • Identify best practices for collection of small biopsy and cytology specimens for ancillary testing;
    • Identify best practices for processing of small biopsy and cytology specimens for ancillary testing;
    • Implement a workflow that optimizes tissue for the necessary lung biomarker testing.

Karen Eldin, MD; Houston, Texas (Moderator)

Objective: These presentations allow pathology residents/ fellows involved in current research in major academic institutions to report their latest findings to a group of academic as well as private practice pathologists.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    • Describe the latest results in research from molecular pathology and other ancillary diagnostic techniques.
    • Compare these findings to traditional diagnostic and prognostic factors.
    • Apply the most accurate diagnostic criteria to their own practices.

Objective: Medical malpractice is an ever present threat in today’s litigious medical world. Pathologists’ risk is not limited to financial loss only. A medical malpractice lawsuit threatens the diminution or loss of reputation, time, confidence, and professional and private social interactions. This lecture addresses methods that may help pathologists better survive a medical malpractice lawsuit.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    • Understand the basics of medical malpractice law, including the typical timeline of a medical malpractice lawsuit; and discuss specific legal criteria that determine medical liability;
    • Learn how to negotiate a deposition and avoid its pitfalls
    • Consider ways to minimize the emotional and psychological impact of a medical malpractice lawsuit on the pathologist and the pathologists’ family.